Donna boss of narcos sues Netflix: “The fiction is inspired by me, I want the TV rights”

Donna boss of narcos sues Netflix: “The fiction is inspired by me, I want the TV rights”
Donna boss of narcos sues Netflix: “The fiction is inspired by me, I want the TV rights”
CopyAMP code

There Reina del Sur it’s me, now pay me my due. Sandra Ávila Beltràn does not have much to rejoice in the past of “Queen of the Pacific”, when for thirty years she sailed on the crest of the traffic of drug between Mexico and the Colombia, alongside the lords of drug trafficking, several of whom were his lovers. Along the way she lost two husbands and a brother, all killed by rival gangs. She survived an attack in a daring way and she was imprisoned for seven years among the Use and the Mexico, two of them solo. In 2017 she returned to freedom and lives in apparently modest conditions, while her lawyers try to reclaim on behalf of the client of the 15 houses, the thirty vintage cars and the 300 jewels that were once part of the queen’s private treasure, among the such as a gold bib studded with 83 rubies, 228 diamonds and 189 sapphires. But when it comes to getting your hands on some of the proceeds from one of the most successful TV series ever produced by Spanish-language TV, Ms. Beltràn’s old pride emerges intact from the fog of her memory. The woman says, and in all likelihood she is absolutely right, that the plot of the series is all taken from her biography of her, and for this she asks in court that Netflix and Telemundo pay her 40% of the profits of the first two series, which aired between 2011 and 2016, before filming the third, scheduled for next October.
Sandra Ávila was born into the luxury and the muffled privilege that her family lineage guaranteed.

LIFE AS A FILM

Third in the generational line of drug lords, she was forced to drop out of classical music and journalism classes when she was kidnapped at the age of seventeen by a young suitor, a career in drug trafficking, who couldn’t bear to be away from her. She was beautiful and seductive, at least as skilled as she was in the use of pistols. After the murder of her first lover, she experienced the legendary years that crowned her as the Queen of the Pacific, a title she earned by stowing nine tons of coca on a cargo ship leaving the port of Colima. Police first dealt with her in 2002 when they found out that she was negotiating the release of her kidnapped son by a criminal gang, in exchange for five million dollars. The narrow drug aristocracy began to adore her when she became the partner of Juan Diego Espinoza Ramirez, El Tigre, lord of the Colombian cartel of Norte del Valle. She was arrested in 2007 in Mexico City after years of hunting, but the prosecutor only managed to take her to court on charges of money laundering, and sentenced her to five years in prison. Similar failure in the US, where Beltràn was extradited in 2012, and where the Chicago prosecutor’s office failed to prove her guilt in drug trafficking. In Mexico you then served another two years in prison, again for money laundering. But in prison she continued to live in the luxury that befits her rank, including complex pedicures and make-up that were guaranteed by her fellow prisoners. An investigation was opened on the visit that Ávila received in her cell from a cosmetic surgeon, who gave her an injection of anti-wrinkle botulinum.
After her release, her life changed under the watchful eye of the police who watched her. In the end it is perhaps more forced normality than indigence that pushes her to file a complaint. Her is an attempt to reclaim for herself the fame of a social position that she has lost, after thirty years of a violent and wretched life.

CopyAMP code


The article is in Italian

Tags: Donna boss narcos sues Netflix fiction inspired rights

PREV “Today I saw a nice modern game, it’s 1968. The best is out”
NEXT The price of LUNA di Terra has stopped at the crossroads