Double world champion Colin Slade announces his retirement from rugby

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The New Zealander is ready to start a new chapter in their lives

Double world champion Colin Slade announces his retirement from rugby (Ph. Sebastiano Pessina)

One of the oval legends hangs up his boots. In fact, at the age of 35, New Zealander Colin Slade has decided to retire.

Double world champion Colin Slade announces his retirement from rugby

The fly-half (back up to a certain Dan Carter), also utility back if necessary, who wore the All Blacks shirt 21 times becoming one of the 21 players in rugby history to win the Rugby World Cup twice ( 2011-2015) is ready to start a new chapter in his life.

A great career at international level, but not only: also many seasons between the Crusaders and the Highlanders in Super Rugby and five seasons in Pau, in the Top14, without forgetting the last two years spent in Japan with the Mitsubishi Sagamihara DynaBoars shirt.

“It’s been a ride, an incredible journey. Fifteen years ago – Slade said on his social profiles – I began to enter a world that changed my life. I couldn’t have dreamed of anything better: playing for incredible teams and representing my region (Canterbury) and country, being part of a team that has won the World Cup twice.
Then I went to France and Japan: an incredible thing for our family. I would like to thank everyone: the fans, the coaches and the players and team mates. And my wife, who was also close to me in the 11 surgeries I had to face due to injuries”.

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“I can’t wait – concluded Slade – to enjoy the next chapter of life, for now I can sit on the sofa and enjoy the vision a bit”.

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The article is in Italian

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